Before I got my first ECT treatment, I was instructed not to eat or drink anything for 12 hours beforehand. When the time for my treatment arrived I was driven to the ECT suite of the mental hospital I’d first stayed in at the beginning of this mental illness saga. I filled out a survey about my depression symptoms and I signed a waiver acknowledging the risks of ECT including confusion, memory loss, nausea, headache and jaw pain.

Once I had filled out the paper work I was given an ID bracelet and instructed to pee in a cup. Then I was taken to a bed and instructed to lay down. My bed was surrounded by curtains on both sides and on one side was the ECT machine. Nurses placed electrodes on my head and an IV in my arm. The nurses who attended to me were kind, helpful and gentle. They in no way resembled Nurse Ratched (the evil nurse from One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest.)

Once the nurses had set me up a doctor came over to my bed. He told me his name and introduced himself as the anesthesiologist who would be performing the ECT. He said he was going to administer the anesthesia through the IV and I would be knocked out shortly afterwards. He asked me to state my name and the procedure I was undergoing. I did so. The nurses gave the all clear to begin the procedure. I felt a brief sting as the anesthesia entered my veins followed by a woozy floating feeling that lasted for a few seconds and then I was out.

I woke up a few minutes later. I experienced no confusion and no pain. I knew exactly where I was and what had happened. Physically I felt fine. A nurse came over and asked me how I was doing. She then helped me off the bed and guided me to the waiting room. In the waiting room I was treated to a selection of snacks and juices

When my mother came to pick me up she spoke to me and to the doctors. We acknowledged that so far the procedure had gone well with no complications. I was told to take it easy for the rest of the day and to call them if I started experiencing any serious side effects. They said it might take a while to see results and that if I didn’t see results from this unilateral ECT treatment they could try bilateral ECT. Unilateral ECT means inducing seizures in one hemisphere of the brain, bilateral means inducing seizures in both hemispheres of the brain. Bilateral ECT carries a greater risk of side effects.

As we got in to the car, my mother and I were both relieved that I had survived my first ECT treatment and that it had been painless. Now we just had to wait and hope that it would produce positive results.

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